Using Energy Wisely

After going to great lengths to insulate and draft-proof this period home, therefore conserving energy, our next priority is to use energy wisely. The following low-energy and energy management technologies will help to achieve this.

MVHR

The principle of mechanical ventilation and heat recovery (MVHR) is to extract warm, moist air from a room and pass it through a heat exchanger which warms the fresh air coming into the building. Some systems have a function which will automatically bypass the heat exchanger in warm weather, therefore helping to maintain a cool temperature within the property.

The MVHR system will help meet some of the heating needs and distribute heat throughout the property. The filters within the system will help prevent potential allergens from entering the home, and the circulation of fresh air will ensure a healthy house. The MVHR system will enable us to overcome any potential damp and condensation problems typically caused by insulating and draft-proofing a property of this age.

Further details of the MVHR system to be installed as part of the green makeover are to follow.

Thermostatic controls and timers

Installing the correct heating controls can significantly help towards making a home more sustainable. Thermostatic controls and timers will not only help to keep the property at a comfortable temperature, but will do so without wasting valuable heat or fuel, therefore reducing carbon dioxide emissions and lowering heating costs.

Further details of the thermostatic controls and timers to be installed as part of the green makeover are to follow.

Energy Efficient Lighting

All lighting in the home will be as energy efficient as possible.

The Energy Saving Trust estimates that 8% of a typical household's energy bill is from lighting. By using LED lighting throughought the property, where possible, rather than traditional filament lamps, halogen lamps or compact flourescents (CFLs) we anticipate a saving of at least £4 per bulb per year will be made.  

The lighting in the property will be carefully designed to correspond with the specific function of each room. By fitting a range of lights within every room, each with a seperate switch or control, less energy will be used than if the lighting for each room were controlled by a single dimmer switch.

Exterior lighting will be connected to both sensors and timers ensuring that external areas of the property are only lit when required.

Further details of the energy efficient lighting to be installed as part of the green makeover are to follow.

Energy Efficient Appliances

When choosing appliances for the property the priority will be to choose an appliance that best fits the requirements of the occupants, in both size and functionality. There would be little point in specifying a small, under-the counter fridge freezer purely because it has an A+++ energy efficiency rating if the family require a much larger, seperate fridge and freezer. Fortunately the energy rating labels on appliances are generally given based on different size categories.

Each appliance within the home will be as energy efficient as possible.

Further details of the energy efficient appliances installed as part of the green makeover are to follow.

Smart Renewable Energy Control Systems

Smart energy control systems will be used to optimise the use of energy produced by the solar PV system. This system will allow electrical loads to be automatically switched on and off at times when the PV array is generating. When the system detects that the PV array is generating in excess of what is currently required within the home, the excess energy will be directed to an immersion heater to heat hot water rather than being exported to the national grid. By using this system we anticipate that 100% of the energy produced by the solar PV can be used within the property.

Further details of the smart renewable energy control systems to be installed as part of the green makeover are to follow.

Rainwater Harvesting

Rainwater harvesting will be used to reduce the home's demand for mains water. The large roof area is an asset for collecting a large volume of rainwater. The home will also be completely re-plumbed, giving the opportunity to use collected rainwater for flushing of the WC's and gardening etc.

Further details of the rain-water harvesting system to be installed as part of the green makeover are to follow.